Workshops

We have 27 workshops (some will be held twice) for you to choose from during conference days. Workshops listed below are not in a particular order. A detailed schedule of each day will be provided as SENIA comes closer. We would like to thank all of you who have graciously volunteered to present at SENIA, 2011.

Classroom Management for Positive Behavior: Terry Shuster, Ruamrudee International School

  • This workshop will provide a foundation, including both classroom set up and interventions, that will promote positive behavior and, in turn, academic achievement. The workshop will cover:  relationship and active listening, classroom environment, procedures, rules, positive reinforcement and interventions.
  • Bio: Terry Shuster, MS Counselor at RIS, has most recently worked as the District Administrator for Behavior for Napa Valley USD in Napa, CA, USA. His position included coordinating all district programming for emotionally disturbed and behavior disordered students, and included consultation and training. In addition, Mr. Shuster taught a graduate course in Classroom and Behavior Management for 8 years at both Holy Names University and St. Mary’s College in the SF Bay Area. Terry has also been a conference presenter for the CA League of Middle Schools and the CA Assoc. of School Administrators.

Myth #1, Curiosity Killed the Cat – Building independence within students who have special educational needs: Lawrence “Wally” Mann, Beijing City International School

  • Building independence within students who have special educational needs is a problem that many kids struggle with. In my presentation, I explore the factors that can impact and strengthen intrinsic motivation,an integral component in cultivating autonomy.
  • Bio: Lawrence “Wally” Mann is a High School Learning Support Teacher at Beijing City International School.  He describes himself as an advocate for all students.  Often, Wally looks back to his own educational history with a wink and a nod, knowing that he shares many characteristics with the students he’s teaching.  While pursuing his MEd in Special Education from Arizona State University, he gained emergency certification to teach at a low resourced urban school in Phoenix, Arizona.   It was there that he gained a firm understanding how positive relationships impact student performance and self-esteem.  This became engrained as he went on to teach public high school in Portland, Oregon, working with students who had mental health and behavior disorders.  His curiosity in other cultures eventually led him to teach internationally in Cairo, Munich and Beijing where his experiences abroad have been the catalyst for his present muse; intrinsic motivation.

Building Resiliency- Family Life Transitions: Dr. Melanie Shafaat  & Court Williams, Ruamrudee International School

  • Transitions are a constant in the lives of all children, but, children with special needs must be given additional guidance and support to work through these life changes. These transitions include a strong relationship between the families and the teaching staff and they begin when a child is first identified. This presentation will walk through several of these milestones and will focus on providing educational training for parents and teachers as it relates to cultural understanding; goal setting for children as they grow into young adults and the transition from high school into the world of adulthood. Working with children who have “invisible disabilities” is the biggest challenge that teachers, parents and especially the students must go through. Students with learning disabilities or those who are on the autism spectrum can and will succeed when there are on-going educational training program in place for families and teachers in different grade levels and content areas
  • Bios: Dr. Melanie Shafaat is a life-long advocate, professional educator, and administrator for children with of all ages and disability categories. She started her international career in Ankara Turkey, after working in 7 different states and briefly in 2 other countries, has recently returned to the International School System and is a special needs teacher at the Elementary School at Ruamrudee International School in Bangkok, Thailand.
    Working to develop programs for students of all ages as they transition from different grade levels to life after high school has been an ongoing passion. Adding the international culture has heightened the need for student advocacy training including opportunities for families to foster their students’ independence and ability to positively contribute to their community. Dr. Shafaat’s work as national speaker at conferences throughout the United States, and her membership on National and State Juvenile Justice Committees, has strengthened her philosophy of the power of resiliency regardless of environmental and cultural risk factors.  Operating from  a strength based approach shifts the perception of potential and possibilities for all students. Whenever possible from her new home in Asia, leisure time is spent enjoying the company of her children Hannah, 26 and Oliver, 22 who are both attending universities in California in their pursuit of their doctorates; travelling throughout as many parts of the world as possible, reading, exploring and enjoying each moment with as much laughter and joy as possible.

How Inclusion Has Been Successful at Jakarta International School: Cathy Craig and Amy Narayan

  • An overview of a working inclusive middle school learning support program. Moving from a primarily pull out model to a more inclusive model where the majority of learning support students receive direct support in co-taught classes.
  • Bios: Cathy Craig has been a grade 8 Learning Support teacher at Jakarta International School for the past five years.  Before that she was a special educator in the Midwestern United States for 8 years.  She has worked in self-contained classrooms, resource rooms, and in inclusive settings at both the middle school and elementary levels.  She believes student programming should be carefully tailored so that diverse learners can find academic success.
  • Amy Narayan is the Grade 6 Learning Support Teacher at Jakarta International School in Indonesia.  She has been supporting fragile learners at both the elementary and middle school levels in Jakarta and Taipei for twelve years.  During this time she has worked with a wide variety of models, students, parents and teachers.  These ranges in experiences remind her of the importance of the focus being on the student when making recommendations and programming decisions.

Teaching in an Inclusive Classroom – encouraging inclusion in your school environment: Norman Lacey, British International School, Shanghai, Pudong

  • Teaching in an Inclusive Classroom – encouraging inclusion in your school environment. Teaching in an international setting is about academic achievement and hiding the special needs element of the school. What can we do to bring Special Needs “out of the closet” and into mainstream thinking and action?
  1. Developing a Pedagogical Plan of action.
  2. An Asian support group for integration and assistance for international students.
  3. Providing positive statistics for the school owners/government,
  4. Creating opportunities for special needs students.
  • We will discuss:
  1. Examinations and support, within the school and within the examination authority’s parameters.
  2. The laws
  3. The financial equation
  4. Parent perceptions
  5. Policies and Guidelines
  6. Examples of success
  7. Supporting our crusaders
  • Bio: Norman’s teaching career began in Australia and from there to China, via a journey of discovery, taking him around the globe. During his educational career he has always worked with children and adults who need some extra assistance and understanding. As well as classroom teaching he experienced working in different environments including  Prison settings, Papua New Guinea, Autism, Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation, Youth Shelters, behaviour improvement & management and improvement of the quality of educational provision for disadvantaged and special needs students as a School Counselor. Norman’s first assignment in England was as a Head of a Special School in Slough, moving into Behaviour & Attendance Improvement and School Improvement Consultancy for Local Education Authorities, employed by the Department for Schools and Education. Norman moved to China to take up the position of Special Needs Educational Coordinator for the British International School Shanghai Pudong Campus in 2008. The British International School Shanghai, Pudong campus has developed and promotes an inclusive and enriching educational program that provides mainstream enrichment for high needs children as well as a Learning Support within the mainstream class room. The initiatives include an off campus learning enrichment centre which is integrated within the school and the organizing of Special Educational Conferences, bringing many sectors of the Special Education community together, with participants, parents and teachers, from many Shanghai schools. Norman believes “learning skills, learning how to learn, are important to everyone and these skills are often overlooked”.

Strategies and Systems for Distracted Student: Michael Boll, Concordia International School, Shanghai

  • Synopsis: Many of us have worked with or know Donny Disorganized. He (well, usually it is a he) is the bright student that may rarely turn in homework, struggles to focus in class and keeps his locker and book bags in a constant, scary state of disrepair. He has frustrated his family and teachers for years and has been the recipient of endless discussions about how he should get motivated and reach his true potential.Modern technology has compounded Donny’s distracted tendencies by surrounding him with endless forms of stimulating and absorbing input that enable him to drift from interest to interest without getting any specific work done.   This workshop will focus on systems, strategies and ideas for helping Donny Disorganized manage his life and cut through the constant distractions that he and we face everyday. Systems that help anchor Donny to what he needs to accomplish.
  • Bio: Michael Boll is a Grade Seven teacher and Technology Coach at Concordia International School, Shanghai. Michael particularly enjoys working with distracted students and figuring out systems to keep them on track.
    In 2003 Michael’s son was diagnosed with Autism and continues to have a profound effect on how he views students that do not neatly fit into our educational system.
    Michael’s presence on the web can be found at his teaching website (www.mrboll.com) and his popular podcast about autism (www.autismpodcast.org).

ADHD in the Classroom: Devalina Mitra and Dawn Mountfield, New International School of Thailand

  • The term ADHD has been around for a long time but what is it?  What characterizes a student with this condition?  How can we as practitioners meet the needs of these learners?  What are the treatment regimes available?
  • The workshop will explain what ADHD is and describe the three different subtypes. It will cover brain research and provide an overview of how the ADHD brain works. It will outline how to diagnose it.  Additionally it will present information about possible treatment plans for both at home and school.  The workshop will include ideas for teaching strategies to employ in the classroom. The final part will cover myths and realities surrounding ADHD.
  • Bio: DEVALINA Mitra- Presently working at NIST as a Secondary Learning Support teacher, she had been working as a Special Ed teacher in Canada both in the private system and the public board. It is there she encountered students who had mild to severe Learning Disabilities with many being identified as having ADHD. Devalina believes it is interesting to see how bright minds can be hampered due to this and the strategies we as teachers could offer so that they can overcome this barrier and be successful individuals.
  • Bio: DAWN Mountfield– Dawn is presently working at NIST as the Elementary Learning Support Coordinator.  Prior to this, she worked as a Special Education teacher in Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe and the UK. As a learning support specialist she is still developing a comprehensive understanding of children with specific learning difficulties and how to reach them. Her philosophy as a learning support teacher is to help support the development of all in the school community by building a circle of trust, cutting-edge practice, ongoing self-reflection, commitment to communication and a tremendous sense of fun.   Her mantra is from a Japanese Proverb, ‘To teach is to learn’ and the learning needs to be boundless and so too must be the desire for it.

Meeting the Needs of Twice Exceptional Learners: Dawn Mountfield, New International School of Thailand

  • There is a belief that the students in school who are most at risk of not achieving their potential are the twice-exceptional learners.  We have all encountered these students.  They are among the most frequently under-identified population in our schools. Twice-exceptional students present a unique identificationand teaching dilemma.  Parents of these children often find themselves in a situation where they are asked to choose between services to address one exceptionality or the other, leaving twice-exceptional students unfulfilled.
  • The presentation will aim to:
  • introduce the characteristics of gifted and talented students
  • provide case studies of a subset of G and T students – twice exceptional students
  • describe common characteristics of students who are both gifted and disabled
  • address identification methods for these students
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of teachers for addressing the needs of twice-exceptional students
  • suggest modifications, accommodations and available resources
  • Bio: Bio: DAWN Mountfield– Dawn is presently working at NIST as the Elementary Learning Support Coordinator.  Prior to this, she worked as a Special Education teacher in Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe and the UK. As a learning support specialist she is still developing a comprehensive understanding of children with specific learning difficulties and how to reach them. Her philosophy as a learning support teacher is to help support the development of all in the school community by building a circle of trust, cutting-edge practice, ongoing self-reflection, commitment to communication and a tremendous sense of fun.   Her mantra is from a Japanese Proverb, ‘To teach is to learn’ and the learning needs to be boundless and so too must be the desire for it.

Curriculum-based measurement (CBM): Loraine Spenciner

  • A component of Response to Intervention (RTI), this powerful
    assessment approach assists teachers in identifying student needs,
    pinpointing what to teach, and monitoring student progress. In this
    workshop, participants use case studies to design a curriculum-based
    measurement and track student progress.  Web tools to graph student
    data will be explored.
  • Bio: See Keynote tab for Loraine’s Bio

Difficult to Manage Children: Elizabeth Noske, Yew Chung International School, Pudong, Shanghai

  • This workshop provides you with the information and strategies you need to understand your difficult to manage child. Defiant children often feel misunderstood and parents feel isolated. You will learn why your standard strategies don’t work, how to stop misbehavior and power struggles, threats, bribes and punishments. The workshop will assist you to set limits, communicate clearly, and motivate and inspire change.
  • Understanding your difficult to manage child
  • How to set firm limits and give clear guidelines
  • Eliminating conflict and setting boundaries with hyperactive children
  • Focus your communication clearly on the message, not the child
  • How to avoid the dreaded power struggles
  • How to inspire compliance and cooperation
  • Why and how the ADD brain works differently
  • Parenting and family strategies for ADD
  • Jeffrey Bernstein’s 10 Days to a Less Defiant Child
  • Change is stressful – expect to be tested and tried
  • Bio: Elizabeth has over 39 years’ experience as a consultant and international trainer, with expertise in the field of recent brain research – and learning and parenting practices congruent with this research.

The Teenage Brain: Elizabeth Noske, Yew Chung International School, Pudong, Shanghai

  • The teenage brain is still changing and growing, biologically and neurologically. This development continues well into the 20s. So it should be no surprise that adolescents can be very different from the children they used to be, but also from the adults they are yet to become. The biggest mistake parents can make is to treat them like adult – they are not! Their brains are still ‘under construction’ in many crucial areas. In this workshop you will learn more about how the teenage brain works and ways to work with, instead of against your developing teenager.
  • It’s not the hormones – the brain is still being constructed
  • The quest of the teenage brain – seeking novelty and innovation
  • Teens as unique individuals, struggling to establish their own identity
  • The volatile frontal lobes of the teenage brain
  • How hormones, particularly testosterone and estrogen affect the structures of the brain
  • The pleasure rush to the brain through indulging in dangerous,risk-taking activities
  • The need to belong to the group
  • Dealing with irritability and mood swings
  • Providing an enriching environment for your teenager
  • Bio: Elizabeth has over 39 years’ experience as a consultant and international trainer, with expertise in the field of recent brain research – and learning and parenting practices congruent with this research.

Sensory Strategies: A Way to Promote Autonomy: Jana Wu, MOT, OTR/LThe Essential Learning Group, Shanghai

  • Everyone has a unique sensory system. People get information from the environment through this unique sensory system. Our brain gathers and organizes such information through our different senses from the external world, and then integrates useful information, and sends it to different parts of the brain for our daily functioning. This process is also called sensory integration. When this process is operating in an atypical way, it is likely to affect a student’s ability to learn, focus, and follow directions at school and in other settings. In this workshop, the basis of sensory integration disorder will be covered, as well as ways to identify possible sensory-seeking behaviors observed in a classroom. Practical strategies to help your students overcome their sensory needs to attain autonomy across the day will also be discussed.
  • Bio: Jana received her Masters of Occupational Therapy from Texas Women’s University in the U.S.A and a B.S. of Traditional Chinese Medicine from Beijing College in China. She also has certifications in sensory integration and assistive technology. Before coming to Shanghai, she worked in the second largest school district in the United States with students’ ages 3 to 21 years old having various learning challenges. She has 15 years of experience as a pediatric occupational therapist and has extended training in working with children that have autism, as well as, children with sensory integration deficits. Jana lived in the U.S. for twenty years and is fluent in Chinese and English.

Toolkit for Learning: Helping Students with Learning Difficulties Access the Curriculum and Achieve! : Tanya Dickson, Shanghai United International School

  • Many students in need of support with their learning in the classroom experience memory, processing, language, meta-cognitive and energy difficulties. Often these needs are ‘invisible’. This workshop will outline specific and practical strategies that mainstream teachers can use to support students with these challenges, to decrease student anxiety levels and to increase feelings of self-esteem, autonomous learning and success!
    Having taught students experiencing learning difficulties for many years, in various countries I observed a pattern to the strategies I was using that helped them access the curriculum and make progress in their learning. The result ……… a specific ‘Toolkit for Learning’ that is simple and easy for teachers and aides to integrate in their day to day teaching across all curriculum areas.

  • Bio: Tanya is a mainstream and Special Education teacher, who has had many years experience working in Australia, the UK and Egypt as an educator, professional development facilitator and consultant. She has been privileged to work with students of varying ages, across different cultures and educational systems – both in the classroom and as a learning support specialist. Tanya has also held varying management and leadership roles as a Regional Advisor and School Head of Special Education. Sharing information and strategies to support individuals experiencing learning difficulties is her greatest passion and she is currently working as the new Special Education Coordinator at Shanghai United international School in China.

Title: Children and Adolescent Mental Health among Expats: Dr. Paul Wang, Clinical Psychologist, Shanghai United Family Hospital

The Learning Objectives are to understand:

  • 1. Common Mental Health Presenting Problems in Children and Adolescents
  • a) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • b) Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct disorders
  • c) Depression (Adjustment problems)
  • d) Anxiety
  • e) Autistic Disorder/Asperger’s Disorder
  • 2. Warning Signs (When to Refer), Criteria, and Differential Diagnosis
  • 3. Etiology of the Disorders and Common Treatments
  • 4. How does culture shock and being an expatriate in a cultural “melting pot” can contribute to children and adolescent mental health problems
  • Bio: Dr. Paul Wang is from the United States. He received his Honors Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Toronto in Canada, then went on to complete his Masters and PhD in Clinical Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University in Los Angeles, California. Dr. Wang has experience providing individual, family, and group therapy for adults, adolescents, and children. He has extensive training in cross-cultural issues and provides culturally-relevant evidence based treatments. Dr. Wang specializes in treating children and adolescents on common mental health diagnoses such as Attachment Disorder, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder/Conduct Disorder, Disruptive Behavior Disorder NOS, Separation Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Adjustment Disorder, Anxiety and Depression, and Substance Abuse/Dependence related Dual Diagnoses.  He was also trained in Health Psychology in which he can address the psychological components of most health issues, including sexual dysfunction, cardiovascular illnesses, COPD, and so forth.  He also has experience addressing stress associated with pre-operation and post-operation procedures and providing counseling to women with postpartum depression.  Dr. Wang is also qualified to do psychological evaluations and neuropsychological assessments.  Dr. Wang received APA accredited internship training, is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in California and Hawaii, and is a member of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Wang is also one of the Board of Directors within the Asian American Psychological Association and is the Chair of the Taiwan Psychology Network.

Exploring iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch apps for Children with Special Needs: Michael Boll, Concordia International School, Miggie Shum, & Travis Welsh

  • In the old days (three years ago) students with special needs were forced to used to use large, expensive and just plain uncool augmentative and alternative, communication (AAC) devices. Today, those devices can be tossed out the window and replaced with a modern, contemporary device based on the iOS (Apple) or Android (Google)
  • I frequently hear about the large number of apps out there for the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch.  Many of these apps. as you surely know, are designed for kids with special needs.
  • Apple China has kindly agree to donate a sum of iPads and iPod touches for us to use while we try out some apps designed for students with special needs
  • These apps include:
  • ProLoQuo To Go
  • AutismTrack
  • iPrompts
  • iCommunicate
  • Sleep Cycle
  • Tap to Talk
  • iComm
  • Participants will also have time to share their favorite apps.  All resources will be listed and linked on the SENIA website (www.senia.asia).
  • Bio: Michael Boll is a Grade Seven teacher and Technology Coach at Concordia International School, Shanghai.
    In 2003 Michael’s son was diagnosed with Autism and that continues to have a profound effect on how he views students that do not neatly fit into our educational system.
    Michael’s presence on the web can be found at his teaching website (www.mrboll.com) and his popular podcast about autism (www.autismpodcast.org).
  • Bio: Travis has been studying and working in education for over 9 years. Prior to living in Shanghai, he worked as a Behavioral Interventionist at a mental health organization in Vermont, USA, providing intensive, individualized support to children in grades K-12 with serious emotional, behavioral, and academic challenges.  He is currently working as a program assistant at the Creative Garden, a day program for the Essential Learning Group.
  • Bio: Originally from Hong Kong, Miggie went to the University of Wisconsin-Madison for her undergraduate work where she majored in Communicative Disorders. She received her Master degree in Communication Disorders from Emerson College in Boston. In the United States, Miggie worked with children diagnosed with various developmental and genetic disorders such as autism and CHARGE syndrome, as well as bilingual children with language delays. Before moving back to Hong Kong in December 2010, she was the Assistant Program Director of the Creative Garden Program and has also worked closely with various international schools in Shanghai.

Executive Functioning and Working Memory:  Implications for learning and academic achievement: Dr. Shari Rosen, Essential Learning Group, Shanghai

  • The term executive function describes a set of cognitive abilities that control and regulate other abilities and behaviors. Executive functions are necessary for goal-directed behavior. They include the ability to initiate and stop actions, to monitor and change behavior as needed, and to plan future behavior when faced with novel tasks and situations.  Working memory is Working memory is the ability to actively hold information in the mind needed to do complex tasks such as reasoning, comprehension and learning. Working memory tasks are those that require the goal-oriented active monitoring or manipulation of information or behaviors in the face of interfering processes and distractions. Children with learning disabilities often present with deficits in working memory and executive functioning. The purpose of this seminar is to present an overview of EF and WM and strategies to assist students with these difficulties.
  • Bio: Dr. Rosen has a Ph.D. in communication science and disorders and is a certified Speech Language Pathologist and Learning Specialist. She has lived in Shanghai since 2003 and has consulted extensively with many of the international schools and families that have children with special learning needs. Prior to moving to Shanghai, Dr. Rosen worked at the University of Washington at the Center for Human Development and Disabilities where she was part of a multidisciplinary developmental assessment team. She has worked with children having severe physical, cognitive, and communication disabilities. She has taught both graduate and undergraduate level courses at Emerson College and Northeastern University. She is a member of the American Speech and Hearing Association. Shari has a particular interest in and is trained in many assessment and interventions for ASD.  She also specializes in working with children having language delays and disorders, and written language disorders as related to executive function difficulties.  She enjoys teaching, lecturing, and family / teacher training.

Language Acquisition and Literacy development: Developing discourse and narratives using Braidy, the Story Braid: Dr. Shari Rosen, Essential Learning Group, Shanghai

  • Narratives allow children to organize life experiences and ideas into meaningful sequences of events and the acquisition of narrative skills is important for success in the early school years.
  • The purpose of this seminar is to introduce story “braids” to foster language development and emergent literacy in the contexts of playing, listening, talking, conversing, retelling, drawing and early written expression; skills that are vital to academic and social success.
  • Bio: Dr. Rosen has a Ph.D. in communication science and disorders and is a certified Speech Language Pathologist and Learning Specialist. She has lived in Shanghai since 2003 and has consulted extensively with many of the international schools and families that have children with special learning needs. Prior to moving to Shanghai, Dr. Rosen worked at the University of Washington at the Center for Human Development and Disabilities where she was part of a multidisciplinary developmental assessment team. She has worked with children having severe physical, cognitive, and communication disabilities. She has taught both graduate and undergraduate level courses at Emerson College and Northeastern University. She is a member of the American Speech and Hearing Association. Shari has a particular interest in and is trained in many assessment and interventions for ASD.  She also specializes in working with children having language delays and disorders, and written language disorders as related to executive function difficulties.  She enjoys teaching, lecturing, and family / teacher training.

Emotional Regulation; an Interactive Workshop: Karlijn de Hoon and Hans Hogewind, the Essential Learning Group, Shanghai

  • Adequate emotional regulation is having an appropriate emotion after a certain event and express this in a useful manner. The process of learning to deal with emotions adequately can take up to adulthood. Inadequate emotional regulation can cause issues with anger management, frustration tolerance, mood swings, anxiety etc. Especially children with special needs can suffer from problems regulating their emotions. They need extra attention, instructions and examples on how to deal with emotions.
  • This workshop focuses on theoretical backgrounds of emotional regulation and how to recognize children or adolescents that have difficulties in their emotional regulation. Besides this, we’ll introduce some techniques to improve emotional regulation in an interactive manner.
  • Bio’s: Karlijn de Hoon Msc. is a Psychomotor Therapist from the Netherlands. She uses play and sport activities to address psychological or social problems in a setting that feels natural to the client. In this way the transfer from therapy/training to daily life is easier made. She has a lot of experience working with children with different developmental and psychiatrical backgrounds on issues like emotional regulation, social skills, self-confidence, etc.
  • Hans Hogewind Msc. is an Educational and Clinical Development Psychologist. He worked as a Child Psychologist at a Mental Health Clinic in Holland. He has experience with assessment, intervention and diagnostics including group and individual counseling, training in behavioral and communication skills, and measuring cognitive and emotional functioning. Hans believes it is important to help children and adolescents develop in healthy ways. Karlijn and Hans both work for the Essential Learning Group Shanghai.

Striving for maximum support in your school community: bringing parents, teachers, students, and admin onto the same page: Leslie Peake, Shanghai American School-Puxi MS Counselor

  • All kids need unconditional love and support.  Children with learning disabilities, or other physical, mental, or emotional needs require extra care and attention at school and home. As educators, one thing we know for certain is, these children often do not fit into standard school routines and expectations. Yet children’s needs shift, both developmentally and emotionally, as they grow through adolescence.  As an educator, how can you ensure challenged students are being supported in developmentally appropriate ways?
  • This workshop will look at the main systems of support from a counselor’s  perspective and allow you to evaluate the different components that promote overall support of your students.  Participants should gain a comprehensive picture of how to move towards maximum, meaningful support for working with challenging students and finding support for yourself.
  • BIO: Leslie Peake currently works as a middle school counselor at Shanghai American School and previously in Kuwait, also as a middle school counselor. Prior to coming overseas 6 years ago, she worked in British Columbia, Canada as a private educational consultant and as an employment and career counselor for 15 years.  Leslie and her husband have a daughter who recently graduated from SAS and a son in grade 11 at SAS. She helps SAS students and teachers de-stress by teaching yoga to those who find greater peace and relaxation through movement. Leslie has an M.Ed in Counseling Psychology and a B.A. in Dance Therapy and Movement Studies.

Effective Ways to Support Students With Challenging Behaviors: Eileen Knobloch, Shanghai American School, Puxi

  • Participants of this workshop will learn to support students with challenging behaviors using a teaching pyramid.  Attendees will have an opportunity to collaborate with peers and apply this new framework to an actual situation in which a child demonstrates challenging behavior.  Learners will walk away with evidence-based interventions to try in their classrooms on Monday morning.
  • Bio: Eileen Knobloch is currently working at Shanghai American School as the early childhood guidance counselor. Eileen is the mother of two amazingly talented children and is happily married to their father. Eileen’s undergraduate degree is from Seton Hill University and her Masters of Education degree is from Plymouth State University.  Eileen has been working in international schools for over 16 years. For more than half of those years, she has been working collaboratively with teachers, parents, administration, and school psychologists to ensure that early childhood students get the support they need to be happy and successful.

Classroom Literacy Techniques:  Phonemic Awareness and Multisensory Approaches- By Julie Schneller, Shanghai & Amy Narayan, Jakarta International School

  • This research-based workshop will address reading instruction through the use of auditory, visual and oral sensory functions.  Presenters will familiarize educators with practices that enhance phonological awareness skills in an effort to promote the important connection between spoken language and written language.  Participants will come away with ready-to-use activities and assessments, as well as resources to further their knowledge and increase their repertoire of multisensory techniques to teach phonological skills within the classroom setting.
  • Bio: Julie Schneller has over 15 years of teaching experience in the area of Reading.  She has helped children learn to read in many capacities:  as a classroom teacher, private tutor, Reading Specialist, Special Educator and mother.  Julie has taught in the United States, England, Austria, Taiwan and China.
  • Bio: Amy Narayan is the Grade 6 Learning Support Teacher at Jakarta International School in Indonesia.  She has been supporting fragile learners at both the elementary and middle school levels in Jakarta and Taipei for twelve years.  During this time she has worked with a wide variety of models, students, parents and teachers.  These ranges in experiences remind her of the importance of the focus being on the student when making recommendations and programming decisions.

Attention, Routines and Management for the Skillful Teacher  – Eric & Darcy Wood, Concordia International School, Shanghai

  • This research based workshop will focus on getting and keeping students’ attention, maximizing routines and 6 models of behavior management to promote progress towards students’ learning goals.  Participants will be provided with the opportunity to add to their repertoire of tools needed as skillful teachers during this practical interactive workshop.
  • Bio:  Eric and Darcy Wood have enjoyed a combined 30 years of teaching students with diverse needs at both the elementary and middle school levels.  Native Californians, both Eric and Darcy hold Masters degrees in Education and have presented together in California as well as internationally.  They have taught in many school settings including inner-city schools as well as private schools.  Eric has also taught classroom management courses for teacher candidates at the University of Phoenix.

Seeing is Understanding: Improving Comprehension- Dr. Bonnie Singer, Architects for Learning, Boston, United States

  • This workshop will explore how spatial processing systems influence listening, speaking, reading, writing, executive functions, working memory, and learning across all grade levels. By focusing on how to use a small set of graphic tools called Brain Frames®, we will explore how teachers can help students interact more deeply with text — the result being that they bolster independence and success with reading comprehension and note taking across all grades and content areas. Participants will leave with practical teaching strategies they can put to use immediately in the classroom to activate background knowledge prior to reading, guide students with making predictions and inferences, heighten students’ recognition of various text structures and purposes, help students identify relevant details and recognize how they relate to main ideas, and give students tools for representing new knowledge and understanding graphically.
  • Bio: Dr. Bonnie Singer, developer of the EmPOWER™ program for teaching writing, will be in Shanghai for the whole week leading workshops and providing training on writing. Dr. Singer is a certified speech-language pathologist who holds Masters and Doctoral degrees in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Formerly an instructor and clinical supervisor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Emerson College, Dr. Singer founded Architects for Learning in 1996. Along with Dr. Anthony Bashir, she developed the EmPOWER™ method for teaching expository writing. With expertise in language, learning, and literacy, she is passionate about working with school-age students of all ages, especially those who struggle with executive functions and written expression. Dr. Singer provides consultation and professional development to teachers and schools nation-wide. Her research interests and numerous publications lie in the relationship between language, cognition, and learning.

The Benefits of Peer Tutoring in the International School Setting- Shari Rosen, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Founder of The Essential Learning Group, Shanghai

  • While the long-term negative impact of struggling learners can be enormous, it is possible for schools to train their own students to deliver effective tutoring to younger peers. Additionally, peer-tutoring programs can improve the skills of tutors as well as tutees in a variety of ways.  It’s a win-win situation. The purpose of this seminar is to introduce the concept of peer tutoring, its effectiveness, and avenues to implement services in schools.
  • Bio: Dr. Rosen has a Ph.D. in communication science and disorders and is a certified Speech Language Pathologist and Learning Specialist. She has lived in Shanghai since 2003 and has consulted extensively with many of the international schools and families that have children with special learning needs. Prior to moving to Shanghai, Dr. Rosen worked at the University of Washington at the Center for Human Development and Disabilities where she was part of a multidisciplinary developmental assessment team. She has worked with children having severe physical, cognitive, and communication disabilities. She has taught both graduate and undergraduate level courses at Emerson College and Northeastern University. She is a member of the American Speech and Hearing Association. Shari has a particular interest in and is trained in many assessment and interventions for ASD.  She also specializes in working with children having language delays and disorders, and written language disorders as related to executive function difficulties.  She enjoys teaching, lecturing, and family / teacher training.

Do I really have to shower ever day I go to work?  Living and vocational skill education for students with special needs.- Tom M. Szyszko, The Essential Learning Group, Shanghai

  • Living and vocational skills are an important, but sometimes overlooked part of a student’s education. This workshop will cover what living and vocational education entails as well as their impact on a student’s life far past just the school years. The workshop is designed to help a teacher or parent incorporate these skills into a student’s current education, be it in a school or real world setting.
  • The presentation will include strategies for teaching living skills at the home and school settings, how to write effective living skill IEP goals, and living skills problem solving. On the vocational side, myths about vocational education will be debunked, differing levels of vocational instruction based on needs will be discussed, as well as how to set up a vocational work center in your school or home.
  • Bio: Tom M Szyszko is the Vocational and Living skills teacher at the Creative Garden in Shanghai, China. He has worked with students with special needs for six and a half years; six of them at a private special needs school in suburban Chicago. He enjoys the fact that what he does on a daily basis can open new doors for his students and give them skills that they can use for life. In addition to vocational and living skills, Tom is experienced in outdoor education and the experiential learning philosophy. Simply put, the more a person can directly experience, the more he or she will retain.

A Little DIBELS will Do- Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills- By Kathy Nutting, Shanghai American School, Pudong

  • DIBELS stands for Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy skills. There are a set of subtests administered individually and takes about 5 to 10 minutes per student. Teacher & student materials are relatively simple to use for either support or classroom teachers.  At Shanghai American School, Pudong, DIBELS screeners are used by the presenter 3 times a year with all kindergarten, and select grade one, two & three students for identification of those who would benefit from intervention or progress monitoring to develop their literacy skills. The presenter will attend her first DIBELS workshop this summer, but would like to share with those interested…
  • Why DIBELS?
  • Quick summary of the research related to DIBELS
  • Check out the DIBELS screening materials K to G3
  • Online tracking options
  • Take a look at information about DIBELS Next – new & improved version
  • Bio: Kathy Nutting teaches at Shanghai American School – Pudong campus. She has been the lower elementary academic support teacher for the past 3 years. Kathy has spent the majority of her 29 years in the regular classroom teaching Preschool to Grade 4 in Canada, Hong Kong and Shanghai.

What Creates Special Education Needs in Children? The observation and analytical understanding of the 21st Century student in a rapidly changing world.- By Norman Lacey, British International School, Shanghai, Pudong

  • The understanding of the creation of a special needs child through the social, mental and physiological effects of the environment. This will include;
  • Foods
  • Allergies
  • Medications
  • Learning Styles and learning methodology
  • Educational practice working against change and technology
  • Observing behaviour
  • Radical thoughts and developments in repairing educational delay
  • Communicating to parents and teachers
  • Planning an educational repair pathway
  • Bio: Norman’s teaching career began in Australia and from there to China, via a journey of discovery, taking him around the globe. During his educational career he has always worked with children and adults who need some extra assistance and understanding. As well as classroom teaching he experienced working in different environments including  Prison settings, Papua New Guinea, Autism, Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation, Youth Shelters, behaviour improvement & management and improvement of the quality of educational provision for disadvantaged and special needs students as a School Counselor. Norman’s first assignment in England was as a Head of a Special School in Slough, moving into Behaviour & Attendance Improvement and School Improvement Consultancy for Local Education Authorities, employed by the Department for Schools and Education. Norman moved to China to take up the position of Special Needs Educational Coordinator for the British International School Shanghai Pudong Campus in 2008. The British International School Shanghai, Pudong campus has developed and promotes an inclusive and enriching educational program that provides mainstream enrichment for high needs children as well as a Learning Support within the mainstream class room. The initiatives include an off campus learning enrichment centre which is integrated within the school and the organizing of Special Educational Conferences, bringing many sectors of the Special Education community together, with participants, parents and teachers, from many Shanghai schools. Norman believes “learning skills, learning how to learn, are important to everyone and these skills are often overlooked”.